SOUTH AFRICA'S RELIGIOUS SECTOR VOWS TO DEFEND ITS INDEPENDENCE | Tunisia News Gazette

SOUTH AFRICA’S RELIGIOUS SECTOR VOWS TO DEFEND ITS INDEPENDENCE

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa’s religious community refuses to be regulated by government or any structure outside its sector, saying the State has no role to play in managing religion in the country.

This emerged at a roundtable discussion of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Rights Commission) to debate the report on the commercialisation of religion in South Africa.

The commission has conducted research into the commercialisation of religion after reports that religious leaders are forcing congregants to eat snakes, grass and spraying them with doom, among other matters.

The report found that, among other things, churches sold religion to poor people, promising them a better life and that poverty drove people to churches, which practise extreme and unethical acts. It therefore recommended that the religious sector to be regulated to protect the vulnerable congregants against exploitation.

Professor Pieter Coertzen from the Faculty of Theology at the University of Stellenbosch says the government has no jurisdiction over the religious sector. The regulation that we are asking for must come from inside the religions themselves. Our big problem with this report is that it is bringing in regulation but it is regulation coming from the side of the State.

The Chairperson of the CRL Rights Commission, Thoko Mkhwanazi-Xaluva, says the commission will not regulate the sector although a number of umbrella bodies will be formed for that. She says documents alone, such as the Bible, have failed to guide and regulate religious leaders hence the cases of questionable practices.

The religious sector, especially Christianity, was sitting and watching and doing nothing. So if you think you can manage these people as churches, this is not a place of let’s pray and cry together, this is a money-making thing that needs to be stopped abruptly and be dealt with aggressively because people are being exploited, people are going to die.

Canadian Jan Erk, a visiting fellow at the South African Institute for International Affairs, warns that this may be challenging as Christians have never agreed on anything in the past.

Historically it’s been impossible to bring all Christians together and agree on what is the correct version of what is in the Bible. So therefore I think the idea of trying to prevent the abuse of those who take advantage of the faith of believers is universal. These fly by night churches could exist outside the spectrum which would make it even harder to manage because there would be the question of if the regulation didn’t work, what would be the next step to deal with this.

The report is to be debated in Parliament soon.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

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SOUTH AFRICA’S RELIGIOUS SECTOR VOWS TO DEFEND ITS INDEPENDENCE

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa’s religious community refuses to be regulated by government or any structure outside its sector, saying the State has no role to play in managing religion in the country.

This emerged at a roundtable discussion of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Rights Commission) to debate the report on the commercialisation of religion in South Africa.

The commission has conducted research into the commercialisation of religion after reports that religious leaders are forcing congregants to eat snakes, grass and spraying them with doom, among other matters.

The report found that, among other things, churches sold religion to poor people, promising them a better life and that poverty drove people to churches, which practise extreme and unethical acts. It therefore recommended that the religious sector to be regulated to protect the vulnerable congregants against exploitation.

Professor Pieter Coertzen from the Faculty of Theology at the University of Stellenbosch says the government has no jurisdiction over the religious sector. The regulation that we are asking for must come from inside the religions themselves. Our big problem with this report is that it is bringing in regulation but it is regulation coming from the side of the State.

The Chairperson of the CRL Rights Commission, Thoko Mkhwanazi-Xaluva, says the commission will not regulate the sector although a number of umbrella bodies will be formed for that. She says documents alone, such as the Bible, have failed to guide and regulate religious leaders hence the cases of questionable practices.

The religious sector, especially Christianity, was sitting and watching and doing nothing. So if you think you can manage these people as churches, this is not a place of let’s pray and cry together, this is a money-making thing that needs to be stopped abruptly and be dealt with aggressively because people are being exploited, people are going to die.

Canadian Jan Erk, a visiting fellow at the South African Institute for International Affairs, warns that this may be challenging as Christians have never agreed on anything in the past.

Historically it’s been impossible to bring all Christians together and agree on what is the correct version of what is in the Bible. So therefore I think the idea of trying to prevent the abuse of those who take advantage of the faith of believers is universal. These fly by night churches could exist outside the spectrum which would make it even harder to manage because there would be the question of if the regulation didn’t work, what would be the next step to deal with this.

The report is to be debated in Parliament soon.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

The Exports Promotion Centre (French:CEPEX) will launch a pilot project for the development of textile
"Tunisia-Spain: Economic Reforms and Investments" is the theme of a business meeting that will be
Minister of Transport Radhouane Ayara completely dismissed on Friday, in a statement to TAP, the
Since the beginning of 2018, the Stock of Reserves has been under heavy pressure, bringing
President Beji CaA�d Essebsi received the credentials of six new ambassadors accredited in Tunis, in